Rutabagas Dinner Rolls Wreath

The rutabagas dinner rolls wreath is a sponsored collaboration with Margaret Holmes, a McCall Farms brand.

Rutabagas dinner rolls served on a tray with whipped butter

Celebrating the holidays with a southern cuisine favorite: rutabagas dinner rolls formed into a wreath!

We enjoy making bread and adding to the holiday menu homemade dinner rolls is a special way to pamper the family and friends. Because who doesn’t enjoy freshly baked bread?

The smell of freshly baked bread is so comforting and that is what the holidays should be too. The dinner rolls recipe is simple and comes together without stress and thanks to McCall Farms who invited us to try Margaret Holmes’s canned diced rutabagas.

The ingredients include canned rutabagas, butter, dry yeast, all-purpose flour, water, and salt.

Formed the rutabagas dinner rolls into a wreath for a festive look. And added whipped real butter to use as a spread. There is nothing better than warm bread with butter, don’t you think so?

Tips for baking rutabagas dinner rolls.

When making rutabagas dinner rolls we need to take into consideration that it requires time and love to come out perfect and looks like you see in the pictures.

Use sifted unbleached all-purpose flour to achieve the best results. The unbleached flour has a denser grain and tougher texture needed for bread and the rutabaga dinner rolls.

This is the canned rutabagas from Margaret Holmes, a McCall Farms brand

Take advantage of using canned rutabagas from the Margaret Holmes brand. It saves time and has good quality. Plus it comes ready to use just drain the water and mash with a fork.

The butter for this recipe has to be good quality and at room temperature. Cut in little cubes for easy integration into the dough. Use active dry yeast or fresh if desired.

Let the dough for the homemade dinner rolls rest inside the fridge for twelve hours before the first rise. This will allow the yeast to ferment slowly and provide a softer texture.

Use a deep savarin mold to help preserve the rounded shape. But a small pizza baking mold could work too.

Why we love Margaret Holmes’s canned products?

Eighty percent of the canned vegetables and produce under the Margaret Holmes brand by McCall Farms comes from farms located within 150 miles of the canning facility. And the remaining produce comes from other reputable growers throughout the United States. Assuring quality and freshness at its peak.

Soft rutabagas dinner rolls formed into a wreath and placed in a rack before serving.

This brand has a variety of canned vegetables and beans including many of the Southern cuisine favorites such as black-eyed peas, collard greens, turnip, yellow squash, tomatoes, butter beans, and rutabagas which we used for making homemade rutabaga dinner rolls.

But, what is rutabagas?

Rutabagas is a vegetable that came about between the cross of a turnip and a cabbage. The best thing is that this vegetable you can eat the roots and the leaves too, so there is no waste!

Depending on the region, the rutabaga also goes by the name of swede, neep, turnip or snagger. While the rutabaga is closed related to the turnip the flavor is milder and sweeter.

An edible bread wreath for the holidays served on a silver tray and paired with whipped butter

This root vegetable many times gets overlooked but in Southern cuisine is commonly used in stews, paired with other vegetables for side dishes, and used in dinner rolls too.

Many say rutabagas are tough to peel so the easiest way to incorporate them into the menu is by using canned rutabaga from Margaret Holmes. Check the product locator to learn where to buy canned rutabaga. I bought Margaret Holmes’s canned diced rutabagas at Publix!

Serving the dinner rolls with a side of whipped butter on a silver plate. The rolls are made with McCalls Farms canned products.

Bake the rutabaga dinner rolls, it is easy!

Include these soft and delicious dinner rolls to your holiday menu, because a meal is not complete until warm bread and butter are added to the table.

Grab the recipe below and watch the step by step recipe video. The most difficult thing is to wait for the rolls to come out of the oven.

Rutabagas dinner rolls served on a tray with whipped butter

Rutabaga Dinner Rolls

Chef Adriana Martin
Celebrating the holidays with a southern cuisine favorite: rutabaga dinner rolls formed into a wreath. The main ingredient is canned rutabaga from Margaret Holmes, a McCall Farms brand. But we are also using all-purpose unbleached flour, one egg yolk, dry instant yeast, lukewarm water, butter, sugar, and salt.
5 from 13 votes
Prep Time 30 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Course Breads, Side Dish
Cuisine American Southern Cuisine
Servings 13 rolls
Calories 150 kcal

Equipment

  • Stand Mixer
  • Kneading hook
  • Scale
  • Sifter
  • Dough cutter scrapper
  • Nonstick deep savarin mold 9.75 inches
  • Parchment paper
  • Pastry brush
  • Cooling rack
  • Mixing bowls
  • Thermometer
  • whisk

Ingredients
  

For the rutabaga dinner rolls dough

  • 390 grams all-purpose flour unbleached approximately 3 1/8 cups
  • 7 grams dry yeast 1 packet
  • 160 milliliters lukewarm water around 2/3 of a cup
  • 40 grams sugar about 1/3 of a cup
  • 1 yolk at room temperature
  • 5 grams salt or 1 teaspoon
  • 25 grams unsalted butter at room temperature (around 1.75 tablespoons)
  • 120 grams canned rutabaga mashed and with no liquid (approx. 3/4 of a cup + 1 tablespoon)
  • baking spray

For the egg wash

  • 1 whole egg
  • 1 tablespoon milk

Instructions
 

  • Measure the flour and sift. Sifting is important for achieving a tender dough and a softer bread.
  • For best results measure all the ingredients using a scale. I have provided approximate measurements in cups but for accuracy, it is recommended to use a digital scale.
  • Proof the dry yeast by mixing the sugar with the lukewarm water. Make sure the liquid is between 110°F-115°F. Let the yeast ferment for 20-30 minutes. Place the mix in a warm place.
  • Open the Margaret Holmes canned rutabaga. Drain the water and measure the correct amount on the scale. Place on a bowl and mash using a fork.
  • Add the sifted flour to a bowl and incorporate the salt using a whisk. Add the mashed rutabaga and the egg yolk. Finally, pour the fermented yeast and mix on the stand mixer using the kneading hook or manually using a Danish dough whisk.
  • When all ingredients are incorporated add the butter and knead again. This dough is a bit sticky has to mix enough until getting a smooth elastic consistency. You will know the dough is ready when showing bubbles.
  • In a plastic tub or a bowl, add cooking oil and cover the bottom and the walls. This will help the dough to keep moisture and prevent from sticking to the plastic container.
  • Place the dough inside the bowl and let it rest inside the fridge for twelve hours covered with a lid. The following day, proceed to remove the dough from the tub and deflate. Form a dough ball and let it rise in a warm place inside the tub or a baking sheet covered for about 15 minutes or more. The dough must double ins size.
  • Add some flour to the working surface, deflate the dough again, work it, and form a log. Using a scraper cutter cut twelve to thirteen pieces making sure all are the same size.
  • Form the rolls making balls and set aside. Spray the savarin mold with baking spray to prevent sticking. Place nine rolls in the mold and let them do a second rise before baking. The second rise can take form 15-20 minutes. The rolls must double in size and should be placed in a warm location.
  • Set the oven at 350°F and preheat. Prepare an egg wash mixing one egg and milk with a fork. When the rolls have doubled in size, paint them with the egg wash using a brush.
  • Place the dinner rolls inside the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.

Video

Notes

Use the remaining dough to create other forms. We made little cross buns that turned out pretty and soft. Making bread requires patience and time. Do not rush the process; take your time, and have fun. I found the process of making bread to be a therapeutic and delicious hobby.

Nutrition

Calories: 150kcalCarbohydrates: 27gProtein: 4gFat: 3gSaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 32mgSodium: 158mgPotassium: 70mgFiber: 1gSugar: 4gVitamin A: 86IUVitamin C: 2mgCalcium: 13mgIron: 2mg
Keyword bread, rutabaga
Tried this recipe?Mention @adrianasbestrecipes or tag #abrecipes on Instagram

Have you tried this recipe? Snap a photo and tag us on Instagram and or Facebook using the handle @adrianasbestrecipes and this hashtag  #ABRecipes Happy Eats!

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21 Comments
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Laura

I can’t believe those rolls rose this nicely with active dry yeast. I have only gotten those results with fresh yeast!

Vaibhav Mehta

5 stars
It resembles what we call Pav Bhaji in Indian food menu, looks tasty really!

Enriqueta

Looks yummy! I’ve somehow never tried rutabagas, and this might be the perfect way to integrate them into a meal.

Amila

5 stars
I love soft dinner rolls.It seems like these are perfect for any meal.And I love the idea of using dinner roll wreaths for the meal during holiday season.

Sri

For the first time I am hearing about Rutabagas!Thanks for letting me know about this vegetable and your recipe looks yummy!

Kasia

5 stars
Looks awesome. I tried once prepare something similar but it wasn’t as good as your recipe!

Lisa

I’ve never had rutabagas before! The rolls look delicious though! I love the smell of fresh-baked bread too.

Coralie

I have never had rutabaga before. These sound delicious. I love making bread with my kids. We will have to make these over Christmas break!

Monica

5 stars
I love warm bread with butter! And yours look so fancy! I’ll have to try this some time.

Krysten

5 stars
How did I not think of getting rutabagas canned? I always use them for chicken noodle soup and they’re annoying to cut up fresh. Thanks so much for sharing this with all of us!

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